Evergreens

Mark Smith's Journal

Work related musings of a geek.

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[staff profile] mark
I was curious about where most of our traffic goes, so I did some stats. This is for the last three or four days (it varies depending on the log files) across our cluster. Note that this only includes things that have hit the webservers. It does not count things that Varnish cached or were static files.

29,135,500   www.dreamwidth.org
 1,122,400   [community profile] scans_daily
   827,666   embedded.dreamwidth.net
   767,377   [community profile] bakerstreet
   445,788   [community profile] rpanons
   392,543   [community profile] hms_anon
   322,810   [community profile] the_love_hotel
   292,852   [community profile] thusia
   264,786   [community profile] dear_mun
   242,286   [community profile] love_hotel_ooc
   181,043   [community profile] paradisa
   180,401   [community profile] cfud
   169,774   [personal profile] anonies
   152,557   [community profile] aather
   150,883   [community profile] lucetilogs
   148,665   [community profile] asgardeventide
   144,921   [community profile] mayfield_rpg
   137,290   [personal profile] anticirclejerk
   136,709   [community profile] ontd_bl
   135,351   [personal profile] gleeme
   121,760   [personal profile] levkonoe
   115,834   [community profile] capeandcowl
   113,491   [community profile] adstringendum
   111,850   [personal profile] sam_storyteller
   110,461   [community profile] gargleblasted
   103,715   [community profile] sirenspull
    99,958   [community profile] singularityrpg
    80,013   [community profile] dramadramaduck
    79,149   [community profile] poly_chromatic
    77,251   [community profile] abaxcity
    76,977   [community profile] amatomnes
    76,555   [community profile] t_and_b_anon
    73,452   [community profile] capeandcowllogs
    73,255   [community profile] caughtinanetwork
    72,669   [personal profile] thefourthvine
    70,014   [community profile] grimm_kink
    68,830   [community profile] club_crimsyn
    68,332   [personal profile] dangermousie
    67,260   [personal profile] oxoniensis
    63,870   [personal profile] bioanonnies
    62,950   [community profile] the_blank_slate
    61,118   [community profile] asgardmeridiem
    59,689   [community profile] roleplaysecrets
    57,807   [community profile] singularitylogs
    57,684   [personal profile] blurts
    56,238   [community profile] exitvoid
    56,140   [community profile] soul_campaign
    55,088   [community profile] languished
    54,082   [personal profile] firecat
    53,026   dreamwidth.org

As expected, the main site (which hosts userpics too) is on top by a lot. Also, I expected the meme journals to be high, but I kind of expected them to top [community profile] scans_daily. Apparently not! Well, good on you all for being our most popular destination. :)
25.02.2012 01:32 am (UTC)

(no subject)

azurelunatic: Oblong coin with image of building, inscription 'IEEE 20 cents'.  (ieee coin)
Posted by [personal profile] azurelunatic
An earlier comment which I can't find now (not yours) mentioned in passing the idea of Dreamwidth as a whole as a "safe space", and I wanted to respectfully disagree with that concept.

You and Mark have said before that Dreamwidth is aiming for as free of speech as possible within the local laws (and of course anti-spam principles; spam isn't free speech, it's littering). This does mean that across the site there are going to be things that any one person finds horrifying, including the people running the site, but which are nonetheless acceptable under the law and Terms of Service.

A "safe space" by definition prohibits a lot more things than free speech does -- there are plenty of things that are perfectly legal but very unsafe. Safe spaces are very important, but take, as you have said, a ton of time and effort to maintain as safe. There is a certain amount of inertia, of course -- once a space is established as safe and with a population that abides by the rules when within it, it does take some doing to upset the equilibrium. But it still takes monitoring and enforcement.

Safe spaces also have to be very responsive to the individuals within them. If you have, for example, an LGBTQ* safe space with US residents, within that space you are probably going to have both people who are so amazingly burned out on the fight for marriage equality that hearing about it makes them weep, and activists who are all pumped up for the next demonstration. In that case, for the sake of the people who are utterly burned out on it, the safe space would need to insulate them from the people who are working on it; the people making the plans for the next rally would have to take themselves elsewhere -- maybe to another room, maybe outside of the safe space altogether. The rally itself probably wouldn't be within the safe space.

Now, any individual is also free to run their journal or community in any way they see fit, within the law or ToS. The official Dreamwidth communities are pretty loosely moderated, but they are still moderated -- for example, you and [staff profile] mark have made the choice to limit the amount of active venting/complaining about LiveJournal that takes place in official spaces like [site community profile] dw_news. Yet those complaints are still allowed on the service as a whole. Some of those complaints are harsh, and I would not recommend that current or former LiveJournal staff and volunteers read some of them, but they are still legal free speech, and still allowed on Dreamwidth.

Since any journal owner or community admin can run their area in any way they want, it is entirely possible (and, because of the diversity of the service and the inclusive nature of the way the site is managed, perhaps even encouraged) to have safe spaces within Dreamwidth. There are tools to enable moderation and enforcement of people's local journal rules, like comment screening, freezing, turning off anonymous comments (which is good for spamfighting anyway), and outright banning other users for any reason whatsoever (did something obnoxious/mean? belonged to a deeply obnoxious/mean community? didn't like their userpic? Any reason whatsoever!)

However, the site as a whole should probably not be considered a safe space. No matter how tempting it is because the official communities are friendly and pretty much the whole range of sentient and creative diversity is accepted -- it is not a good idea because it's far worse to find something alarming in what you thought was a safe space, than it is to find that same thing outside of a safe space.
Edited (oh right, not d's comment) 25.02.2012 03:18 am (UTC)